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Expression profile of metastasis-associated genes in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

  • Li Pei
  • Ling Zhiqiang
  • Yong Hongyan
  • Huang Youtian
  • Zhao Mingyao
  • Zheng Zhimin
  • Dong Ziming
Article

Summary

The differentially expressed genes between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) with or without lymphatic metastasis were investigated by gene chip and the lymphatic metastasis-associated genes were screened out. Expression array was used to detect the mRNA from both the primary carcinoma and the corresponding esophageal epithelium in 15 cases of human ESCC. The lymphatic metastasis-associated genes were screened by bioinformatics between ESCC with or without lymphatic metastasis. The results showed that 43 (4.85%) genes significantly differed between the ESCC with and without lymphatic metastasis (P<0.05), of which 18 (2.03%) were upregulated and 25 (2.82%) down-regulated. The up-regulated genes were involved in cell adhesion molecules and cell membrane receptors and the down-regulated genes were mostly cell cycle regulators and intracellular signaling molecules. It was suggested that lymphatic metastasis-associated genes were screened by gene chip, which was helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of ESCC lymphatic metastasis and lymphatic metastasis-associated genes might be used as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for lymphatic metastasis.

Key words

esophageal squamous cell carcinoma gene chip lymphatic metastasis gene expression profile 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Pei
    • 1
  • Ling Zhiqiang
    • 2
  • Yong Hongyan
    • 1
  • Huang Youtian
    • 1
  • Zhao Mingyao
    • 1
  • Zheng Zhimin
    • 1
  • Dong Ziming
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathophysiology, College of Medical SciencesZhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouChina
  2. 2.Institute of BioengineeringZhejiang Academy of Medical SciencesHangzhouChina

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