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Virchows Archiv B

, 58:371 | Cite as

Morphometric study of the superior cervical and stellate ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rats during the prehypertensive stage

  • M. Kondo
  • M. Terada
  • D. Shimizu
  • T. Fujiwara
  • R. Tabei
Article

Summary

To compare the functional state of the superior cervical (SCG) and stellate sympathetic ganglia (SG) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with those of age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), ganglion cell volume and area occupied by ganglion cells relative to each whole ganglionic area were morphometrically examined using the Texture Analyse System (TAS) in rats at 0, 10 and 30 days of age. The weight of each ganglion relative to animal weight was also measured. The ganglion cell volume and the relative area of ganglionic cells in both ganglia of SHR were significantly larger (P<0.05) than those of age-matched WKY at ages 0 and 10 days after birth. The relative ganglionic weights of SHR were significantly larger (P<0.01) compared with those of WKY at all ages examined, except for SG at 0 days after birth. These results show that the relative volume of sympathetic ganglion cells is greater in both SCG and SG of SHR than that of WKY, suggesting that hyperfunction of sympathetic ganglia occurs at the prehypertensive stage as a primary factor in the development of hypertension in SHR.

Key words

Spontaneously hypertensive rat Superior cervical ganglion Stellate ganglion Morphometry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kondo
    • 1
  • M. Terada
    • 1
  • D. Shimizu
    • 2
  • T. Fujiwara
    • 3
  • R. Tabei
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyEhimeJapan
  2. 2.Central Research LaboratoryEhimeJapan
  3. 3.Laboratory Animal Center Ehime University School of MedicineShitsukawa, Shigenobu, Onsen-gun, EhimeJapan

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