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Virchows Archiv B Cell Pathology Zell-pathologie

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 234–238 | Cite as

Immunofluorescent localisation of calcitonin in medullary (C Cell) thyroid carcinoma, using antibody to the pure porcine hormone

  • G. Bussolati
  • G. V. Foster
  • M. B. Clark
  • A. G. E. Pearse
Article
  • 29 Downloads

Summary

In spite of considerable differences in the amino-acid sequences of human and porcine calcitonin, cross reactivity is demonstrable, by indirect immunofluorescence, between human C cells and porcine antibody. In a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, removed from a 19-year old female, about 40% of the tumour cells contained calcitonin. The hormone was present not only in the cytoplasm but also, in many instances, in the nucleoli. This latter finding has not been observed by us, or reported by others, in normal C cells from any animal species.

Keywords

Calcitonin Thyroid Carcinoma Parathyroid Gland Human Thyroid Medullary Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Lokalisation von Calcitonin in menschlichen, medullären (C-Zellen) Schilddrüsencarcinomen durch Immunofluorescenz mit Antikörpern gegen das reine Schweinehormon

Zusammenfassung

Obwohl die Aminosäurereihen in menschlichen und Schweinecalcitonin unterschiedlich sind, läßt sich eine Kreuzreaktivität durch indirekte Immunofluorescenz zwischen menschlichen C-Zellen und Schweineantikörpern nachweisen. In einem medullären Schilddrüsencarcinom von einer 19jährigen Patientin enthalten ungefähr 40% der Tumorzellen Calcitonin. Das Hormon fand sich nicht nur im Cytoplasma, sondern oft auch in Nucleolen, ein Befund, der weder von uns noch von anderen in normalen C-Zellen anderer Species beschrieben wurde.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bussolati
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. V. Foster
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. B. Clark
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. G. E. Pearse
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of HistochemistryRoyal Postgraduate Medical SchoolLondon W. 12
  2. 2.Royal Postgraduate Medical SchoolHammersmith HospitalLondon W. 12
  3. 3.Institute of Morbid AnatomyUniversity of TurinItaly

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