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Virchows Archiv B

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 179–196 | Cite as

The ultrastructure of the interfollicular epidermis of the hairless (hr/hr) mouse

V. The cytoplasm of the horny cells
  • Nils Raknerud
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Summary

The ultrastructure of horny cells in the interfollicular epidermis of the hairless mouse and in the mouse with hair has been studied with particular emphasis on changes in the cytoplasm through the horny layer. Horny cells from the two strains have a similar appearance, and the horny layer can be divided into three sublayers, each with a different ultrastructure. It is suggested that in vivo the same arrangement of densely packed filaments and fibrils which represents the keratin pattern in the basal sublayer is preserved throughout the horny layer. However, the filaments and interfilamentous substance seem to undergo a continuous transformation, which possibly results in a disintegration of the filaments when desquamation of the uppermost cell takes place.

Keywords

Ultrastructure Horny cells Epidermis Mouse 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nils Raknerud
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PathologyUniversity of OsloRikshospitalet, OsloNorway

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