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Journal of Tongji Medical University

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 212–216 | Cite as

Study of heat shock protein HSP90α, HSP70, HSP27 mRNA expression in human acute leukemia cells

  • Xiao Kanyan
  • Liu Wenli
  • Qu Shen
  • Sun Hanying
  • Tang Jinzhi
Article

Summary

The expression of three heat shock proteins (HSPs)-HSP90α, HSP70, HSP27 in cells obtained from 22 patients with leukemia, K562 erythroleukemia cell line, and normal blood cells was observed by means of RNA dot blot analysis. The results showed that the expression of the HSP27 gene was enhanced in 4 cases of acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 7 cases of acute nonlymphoid leukemia (ANLL) and 2 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome. (MDS) as compared with that of the normal blood Cells, yet there was no significant difference in the HSP27 expression between the ALL and ANLL cells. The expression of HSP70 in all the 5 ALL and ANLL patients was much lower than that of the normal subjects, except 1 case of ALL and 1 case of MDS, in which the expression was obviously enhanced. All the cases including 11 ANLL, 5 ALL and 1 MDS had higher HSP90α expression than the normal subjects. The enhanced expression pf HSP90α in leukemia cells may be associated with the active and indefinite proliferation of leukemia cells. Our results also suggest that the high expression of the HSP27 gene may not be confined to a specific type of acute leukemia.

Key words

acute leukemia leukemia cell heat shock protein 

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Copyright information

© Springer 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiao Kanyan
    • 1
  • Liu Wenli
    • 1
  • Qu Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sun Hanying
    • 1
  • Tang Jinzhi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Hematology, Tongji HospitalTongji Medical UniversityWuhan
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, School of Basic Medical SciencesTongji Medical UniversityWuhan

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