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Journal of Tongji Medical University

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 200–202 | Cite as

The change of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

  • Liu Huiguo
  • Liu Jin
  • Xiong Shengdao
  • Shen Guanxin
  • Zhang Zhenxiang
  • Xu Yongjian
Article

Summary

The levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) expression in culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were measured and the relationship between OSAS and IL-6 or TNF-α expression studied. Both IL-6 and TNF-α were detected by using ELISA in 22 patients with OSAS and 16 normal controls. The levels of LPS-induced IL-6 (787.82±151.97 pg/ml) and TNF-α (4165.45±1501.43 pg/ml) expression in the supernatant of the culture of PBMC and plasma level of IL-6 (50.67±4.70 pg/ml) and TNF-α (299.09±43.57 pg/ml) in the patients with OSAS were significantly higher than those in the normal controls (in the supernatant of the culture of PBMC: 562.69±197.54 pg/ml and 1596.25±403.08 pg/ml respectively; in the plasma; 12.69±2.75 pg/ml and 101.88±21.27 pg/ml respectively). There were significantly positive correlation between the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and the percentage of time of apnea and hyponea, as well as the percentage of time spending at SaO2 below 90 % in the total sleep time. It was concluded that LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF-α levels as well as plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the patients with OSAS were up-regulated, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of OSAS.

Key words

obstructive sleep apnea syndrome interleukin-6 tumor necrosis factor 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liu Huiguo
    • 1
  • Liu Jin
    • 1
  • Xiong Shengdao
    • 1
  • Shen Guanxin
    • 2
  • Zhang Zhenxiang
    • 1
  • Xu Yongjian
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji HospitalTongji Medical UniversityWuhan
  2. 2.Institute of Immunology, Research Center of Experimental MedicineTongji Medical UniversityWuhan

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