Advertisement

Coexistence of immune-neuro-endocrine substances in the rat central neurons

  • Zhu Changgeng
  • Liu Qingying
  • Wei Ying
  • Ma Chunling
  • Hao Jiandong
  • Yan Ping
Article

Summary

To investigate the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2), metabotropic glutamate receptor subunit 1 (mGluR1) and estrogen receptor (ER) in neurons of the rat central nervous system (CNS) and identify the coexistence possibility of these immune-neuro-endocrine substances in the central neurons, the tri-labeling immunocytochemical technique with different species-specific primary antibodies (goat anti-IL-2 antibody, rabbit anti-mGluR1 antibody and mouse anti-ER anti-body) were used to incubate two serial neighbor sections (one for demonstrating IL-2, another for mGluR1 and ER) of the cerebral cortex, medulla oblongata and spinal cord. There were IL-2-, mGluR1-and ER-immunoreactivity (IR)-positive labeled neurons in the above-mentioned central areas. The IL-2-IR production showed brown color, located in the cytoplasm; In the neighbor serial section, the mGluR1-IR, production showed blue-black color, located on the cell membranes the ER-IR production also showed brown color, located in the cytoplasm and nuclei. There were mGluR1/ER double-labeled cells in the same section, which accounted for about 50 %–60% of the total single and double labeled neurons. It was identified by projection check of serial neighbor sections that had mGluR1/ ER/IL-2 tri-labeled cells, which accounted for about 30% of total mGluR1/ER double-labeled neurons. The results indicate that mGluR1, ER and Il-2 can coexist in the same rat central neurons, therefore, providing morphological basis for the theory about immune-neuro-endocrine network at the cellular level for the first time.

Key words

metabotropic glutamate receptor estrogen receptor interleukin-2 neuron immunocytochemistry 

References

  1. 1.
    Besedovsky H, Sorkin E. Network of immuneneuro-endocrine interactions. Clin Exp Immunol, 1997, 27(1):1Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bateman A, Singh A, Kral T. The immune-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Endocrine Rev, 1989, 10(1):92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Plate-Salaman C R. Immunoregulators in the nervous system. Neurosci Biobehav Rev, 1991, 15(1):185CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gangolli E A, Conneely O M, O’Malley BW. Neurotransmitters activate the human estrogen receptor in a neuroblastoma cell line. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 1997, 61 (1-2): 1PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kavelaars A, Jeurisen F, Heijnen C T. Substance P receptors and signal transduction in leukocytes. Immunomethods, 1994, 5(1):41PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Greco B, Edwards DA, Michael R Pet al. Androgen receptors and estrogen receptors are colocalized in male rat hypothalamic and limbic neurons that express FOS immunoreactivity induced by mating. Neuroendocrinology, 1998, 67 (1):18PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Pakan D R, Sapolsky R M. Glucocorticoid endangerment of the hyppocampus: tissue, steroid and receptor specificity. Neuroendocrinology, 1990, 51(3):613CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sternberg E M. Neural-immune interaction in health and disease. J Clin Invest, 1997, 100 (11):2641PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    De Sarro G, Rotiroti D, Audino M Get al. Effect of interleukin-2 on various models of experimental epilepsy in DBA/2 mice. Neuroimmunomodulation, 1994, 1(6):561CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wang Z M, Li Y Q, Shi J. Localization and distribution of mGluR1-1α in the brain of the rats. Acta Anatomica Sinica, 1996, 27(3):225Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Yukhananov R Y, Handa R T. Estrogen alters proenkephalin RNAs in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus following stress. Brain Res, 1997, 764(1-2), 109PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ferré S, Fredhelm B B, Morelli Met al. Adenosine-dopamine receptor-receptor interaction as an integrative mechanism. TINS, 1997, 20(10):482PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhu Changgeng
    • 1
  • Liu Qingying
    • 1
  • Wei Ying
    • 1
  • Ma Chunling
    • 1
  • Hao Jiandong
    • 1
  • Yan Ping
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medical SciencesTongji Medical UniversityWuhan

Personalised recommendations