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Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 116–120 | Cite as

A glutamic acid producingStreptomyces sp

  • S. Chatterjee
  • S. P. Chatterjee
Article

Abstract

Following the bioautographic technique, a strain ofStreptomyces sp. has been isolated producingL-glutamic acid. The strain is able to grow and produce glutamate in mineral salt medium, but supplementation with yeast extract improved the yield.

Keywords

Glutamate Streptomyces Mineral Salt Medium Aerial Mycelium Monosodium Glutamate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Chatterjee
    • 1
  • S. P. Chatterjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Microbiology Laboratory, Department of BotanyBurdwan UniversityWest BengalIndia

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