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Fibers and Polymers

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 313–317 | Cite as

Study on anisotropic creep behavior of nonwoven geotextiles

  • A. Das
  • V. K. Kothari
  • A. Kumar
  • M. S. Mehta
Article

Abstract

The anisotropy in creep behavior of two types of nonwoven fabrics (needle-punched and thermobonded spun laid) has been studied. It has been observed that the amount of time dependent extension depends on the direction, amount of loading and the structure of nonwoven the fabrics. The time dependent extension (creep) for the nonwoven fabric increases with the increase in amount of load. The higher initial extension and creep are observed for needle-punched nonwoven fabric as compared to thermobonded spun-laid nonwoven fabric. The creep behavior of needle-punched nonwoven shows a logarithmic relationship with time, but the thermobonded spun-laid nonwoven fabric does not show such logarithmic relationship. For a particular fabric, the creep is dependent on the fiber arrangement and is minimum in the direction in which the proportion of fiber is maximum and visa versa.

Keywords

Anisotropy Nonwoven Creep Geotextiles Needle-punched Thermobonded spun-laid 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Fiber Society 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Das
    • 1
  • V. K. Kothari
    • 1
  • A. Kumar
    • 1
  • M. S. Mehta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Textile TechnologyIndian Institute of TechnologyNew DelhiIndia

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