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Chinese Journal of Geochemistry

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 115–120 | Cite as

Experimental study on hydrocarbon formation due to reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals in deep earth

  • Weng Kenan
  • Wang Benshan
  • Xiao Wansheng
  • Xu Shiping
  • Lu Guangcai
  • Zhang Huizi
Article

Abstract

In order to investigate the mechanism of formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the depth of the Earth, experimental research on reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals was carried out at the pressure of about 1 GPa and the temperature range of 800–1500°C. The reactions took place in an open and nonequilibrium state. Chromatographic analyses of the gas products indicate that in the experiments there were generated CH4-dominated hydrocarbons, along with some CO2 and CO. Accordingly, we think there is no essential distinction between free-state water and hydroxy in the minerals in the process of hydrocarbon formation. This study indicates that reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals should be an important factor leading to the formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the Earth's depth.

Key words

carbonate wate and water-bearing mineral abiogenetic hydrocarbon formation mechanism deep Earth 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Weng Kenan
    • 1
  • Wang Benshan
    • 1
  • Xiao Wansheng
    • 1
  • Xu Shiping
    • 1
  • Lu Guangcai
    • 1
  • Zhang Huizi
    • 1
  1. 1.Guangzhou Institute of GeochemistryChinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina

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