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Relationship between host survival and the type of immune response in different organs during disseminated candidiasis

  • Cao Fei
  • Li Jiawen
  • Yan Xiaofeng
  • Wu Yanqing
  • Zhang Demei
Article

Summary

To examine the relationship between host survival and the type of immune response in different organs during disseminated candidiasis, the murine model of disseminated candidiasis was established by injection withCandida albicans via tail vein. The survival time was observed for up to 60 days. And the expression levels of cytokines in the spleen and kidney, including IFN-γ and IL-4, were determined with RT-PCR. Our results showed that in the spleen, both non-fatal and fatal inoculum caused a type II immune response with steady expression levels of IFN-γ and the obviously increased levels of IL-4. While in the kidney, non-fatal inoculum induced a type I immune response with the obviously increased levels of IFN-γ and the steady expression levels of IL-4. However, fatal inoculum induced a type II immune response with a constant expression of IFN-γ and the evidently increased levels of IL-4. It is concluded that in disseminated candidiasis, host survival is associated with the type of immune responses in the kidney, but not in the spleen.

Key words

disseminated candidiasis interferon-γ interleukin-4 animal testing alternatives 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cao Fei
    • 1
  • Li Jiawen
    • 1
  • Yan Xiaofeng
    • 1
  • Wu Yanqing
    • 1
  • Zhang Demei
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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