Advertisement

The Botanical Review

, Volume 2, Issue 7, pp 373–396 | Cite as

Plants made poisonous by selenium absorbed from the soil

  • Sam F. Trelease
  • Alan L. Martin
Article

Keywords

Selenium Botanical Review Sodium Selenite Selenium Content Selenium Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    Anonymous (Science Service). A disease supposed to be due to grain. Science 75. Supplement, p. 10. May 27, 1932.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beath, O. A. Selenium in native range plants occurring on soils derived from Permian or Triassic (?) sediments. Science83: 104. 1936.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    -,Draize, J. H., And Eppson, H. F. Three poisonous vetches. Wyo. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 189. 23 p. 1932.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    -,Eppson, H. F., And Gilbert, C. S. Selenium and other toxic minerals in soils and vegetation. Wyo. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 206. 55 p. 1935.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    —,Draize, J. H., Eppson, H. F., Gilbert, C. S., And Mc-Creary, O. C. Certain poisonous plants of Wyoming activated by selenium and their association with respect to soil types. Jour. Amer. Pharm. Assoc.23: 94–97. 1934.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    -,Draize, J. H., And Gilbert, C. S. Plants poisonous to livestock. Wyo. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 200. 82 p. 1934.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Brenner, W. Züchtungsversuche einiger in Schlamm lebenden Bakterien auf selenhaltigen Nährboden. Jahrb. Wiss. Bot.57: 95–127. 1916.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Byers, H. G. Selenium, vanadium, chromium, and arsenic in one soil. Indus. and Engin. Chem., News Ed.12: 122. 1934.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    -. Selenium occurrence in certain soils in the United States, with a discussion of related topics. U. S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bull. 482. 47 p. 1935.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cameron, C. A. Preliminary note on the absorption of selenium by plants. Roy. Dublin Soc. Sci. Proc.2: 231–233. 1880.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Crawford, A. C. Laboratory work on loco-weed investigations. U. S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Pl. Indus. Bull.121: 39–40. 1908.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Draize, J. H., And Beath, O. A. Observations on the pathology of blind staggers and alkali disease. Jour. Amer. Vet. Med. Assoc.86: 753–763. 1935.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Dudley, H. C. Toxicology of selenium. I. A study of the distribution of selenium in acute and chronic cases of selenium poisoning. Amer. Jour. Hygiene23: 169–180. 1936.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    —. Toxicology of selenium. II. The urinary excretion of selenium. Amer. Jour. Hygiene23: 181–186. 1936.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    —,And Byers, H. G. Determination of selenium; quantitative determination on animal matter and clinical test in urine. Indus. and Engin. Chem., Analyt. Ed.7: 3–4. 1935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Franke, K. W. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. I. Results obtained in preliminary feeding trials. Jour. Nutrit.8: 597–608. 1934.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    —. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. II. The occurrence of the toxicant in the protein fraction. Jour. Nutrit.8: 609–613. 1934.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    —. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. X. The effect of feeding toxic foodstuffs in varying amounts, and for different time periods. Jour. Nutrit.10: 223–231. 1935.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    — A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. XI. The effect of feeding toxic and control foodstuffs alternately. Jour. Nutrit.10: 233–239. 1935.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    —,And Moxon, A. L. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. IV. Effect of proteins on yeast fermentation. Jour. Nutrit.8: 625–632. 1934.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    -,Moxon, A. L., Poley, W. E., And Tully, W. C. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. XII. Monstrosities produced by the injection of selenium salts into hens’ eggs. Anatom. Rec.65. (In press.) 1936.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    —,And Painter, E. P. Selenium in proteins from toxic foodstuffs. I. Remarks on the occurrence and nature of the selenium present in a number of foodstuffs or their derived products. Cereal Chem.13: 67–70. 1936.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    —,And Painter, E. P. Selenium in proteins from toxic foodstuffs. IV. The effect of feeding toxic proteins, toxic protein hydrolysates, and toxic protein hydrolysates from which the selenium has been removed. Jour. Nutrit.10: 599–611. 1935.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    —,And Potter, V. R. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. III. Hemoglobin levels observed in white rats which were fed toxic wheat. Jour. Nutrit.8: 615–624. 1934.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    —,And Potter, V. R. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. IX. Toxic effects of orally ingested selenium. Jour. Nutrit.10: 213–221. 1935.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    —,And Potter, V. R. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. XIII. The ability of rats to discriminate between diets of varying degrees of toxicity. Science83: 330–332. 1936.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    -,Rice, T. D., Johnson, A. G., And Schoening, H. W. Report on a preliminary field survey of the so-called “alkali disease” of livestock. U. S. Dept. Agr. Circ.320. 9 p. 1934.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    —,And Tully, W. C. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. V. Low hatchability due to deformities in chicks. Poultry Sci.14: 273–279. 1935.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Gnadinger, C. B. Selenium. Insecticide material for controlling red spider. Indus. and Engin. Chem.25: 633–637. 1933.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Heller, V. G. The effect of saline and alkaline waters on domestic animals. Okla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull.217. 1933.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Hurd-Karrer, A. M. Inhibition of selenium injury to wheat plants by sulfur. Science78: 560. 1933.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    —. Selenium injury to wheat plants and its inhibition by sulphur. Jour. Agr. Res.49: 343–357. 1934.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    —. Factors affecting the absorption of selenium from soils by plants. Jour. Agr. Res.50: 413–427. 1935.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Larsen, C., And Bailey, D. E. Effect of alkali water on dairy cows. S. D. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull.147. pp. 300–325. 1913.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    —,White, W., And Bailey, D. E. Effects of alkali water on dairy products. S. D. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull.132. pp. 220–254. 1912.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Levine, V. E. The effect of selenium compounds upon growth and germination in plants. Amer. Jour. Bot.12: 82–90. 1925.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    Lipp, C. C. Alkali disease. Veterinary Alumni Quart.10: 54–55. 1922.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Lougee, F. M., And Hopkins, B. S. Selenium compounds as spray materials. Indus. and Engin. Chem.17: 456–459. 1925.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Madison, T. C. Sanitary report—Fort Randall.In Coolidge, R. H., Statistical report on the sickness and mortality in the Army of the United States. January, 1855, to January, 1860. U. S. Cong. 36th 1st sess., Senate Ex. Doc.52: 37–41. 1860.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Moxon, A. L., And Franke, K. W. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. VIII. The effect of certain salts on enzyme activity. Indus. and Engin. Chem.27 77–81. 1935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Nelson, E. M., Hurd-Karrer, A. M., And Robinson, W. O. Selenium as an insecticide. Science78: 124. 1933.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Painter, E. P., And Franke, K. W. Selenium in the proteins from toxic foodstuffs. II. The effect of acid hydrolysis. Cereal Chem.13. (In press.) 1936.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    And Franke, K. W. Selenium in proteins from toxic foodstuffs. III. The removal of selenium from toxic protein hydrolysates. Jour. Biol. Chem.111: 643–651. 1935.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Peters, A. T. A fungus disease in corn. Nebr. Agr. Exp. Sta. 17th Ann. Rept. pp. 13–22. 1904.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Potter, V. R., And Elvehjem, C. A. The effect of selenium on cellular metabolism. The rate of oxygen uptake by living yeast in the presence of sodium selenite. Biochem. Jour.30: 189–196. 1936.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Rader, L. F., Jr.,And Hill, W. L. Occurrence of selenium in natural phosphates, superphosphates, and phosphoric acid. Jour. Agr. Res.51: 1071–1083. 1935.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Robinson, W. O. Determination of selenium in wheat and soils. Jour. Assoc. Off. Agric. Chem.16: 423–424. 1933.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Schneider, H. A. Selenium in nutrition. Science83: 32–34. 1936.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    Stoklasa, J. Über die Einwirkung des Selens auf den Bau- und Betriebsstoffwechsel der Pflanze bei Anwesenheit der Radioaktivität der Luft und des Bodens. Biochem. Zeits.130: 604–643. 1922.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    —. Influence du sélénium et du radium sur la germination des grains. Compt. Rend. Acad. Sci. Paris174: 1075–1077. 1922.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    —. Influence du sélénium sur l’évolution végétale en présence ou en l’absence de radioactivité. Compt. Rend. Acad. Sci. Paris174: 1256–1258. 1922.Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Stover, N. M., And Hopkins, B. S. Fungicidal and bactericidal action of selenium and tellurium compounds. Indus. and Engin. Chem.19: 510–513. 1927.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. 53.
    Strock, L. W. The distribution of selenium in nature. Amer. Jour. Pharm.107: 144–157. 1935.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Tully, W. C., And Franke, K. W. A new toxicant occurring naturally in certain samples of plant foodstuffs. VI. A study of the effect of affected grains on growing chicks. Poultry Sci.14: 280–284. 1935.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Wilcox, E. V. Looking selenium in the eye. Country Gentleman105 (11): 8, 73–75. November, 1935.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1936

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sam F. Trelease
    • 1
  • Alan L. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Columbia UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations