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Economic Botany

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 411–432 | Cite as

Two important “root” foods of the Northwest Coast Indians: Springbank clover (Trifolium wormskioldii) and Pacific silverweed (Potentilla anserina ssp. pacified)

  • Nancy J. Turner
  • Harriet V. Kuhnlein
Article

Abstract

Two edible “root” species, springbank clover (Trifolium wormskioldii), and Pacific silverweed (Potentilla anserina ssp. pacifica), are described and their use as food by Northwest Coast Indian peoples documented. Descriptions of traditional harvesting, cooking and serving, and storage techniques for these foods are provided, and their future potential as a food source along the Northwest Coast is discussed.

Keywords

Economic Botany Native People Gaultheria Shallon National Museum Northwest Coast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© New York Botanical Garden 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy J. Turner
    • 1
  • Harriet V. Kuhnlein
    • 2
  1. 1.British Columbia Provincial MuseumVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Division of Human NutritionUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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