American Potato Journal

, Volume 48, Issue 1, pp 1–15 | Cite as

Production and chemical composition of potatoes related to placement and rate of nitrogen

  • W. M. Laughlin


Experiments with 11 N rates were conducted 3 years with Kennebec potatoes on Bodenburg silt loam in the Matanuska Valley of Alaska. Fertilizer placed in the row was compared with that mixed with the soil in the row for 2 years. Foliage and tuber samples were analyzed for chemical content.

Stand reduction and decreased vigor occurred when row placed N exceeded 120–160 1b per acre. Foliage dry matter decreased 2 years as rate of N increased. Tuber dry matter was decreased one year by N rates exceed ing 100 1b per acre. U. S. No. 1 yield and dry matter with row placement of fertilizers at 40–80 1b N were highest in 2 years. When fertilizer was mixed with soil, both US No. 1 and dry matter yields increased each year with each N increment through 160 1b per acre.

Increasing amounts of N tended to increase the N in foliage and tubers, the Mn in foliage but to decrease the Ca, Mg, Al, Ba, and Sr in foliage. Mixing the fertilizer with the soil as compared to placement in the row increased the Ca, Mg, Al, Ba, Fe, and Sr in foliage, and the tuber uptake of N, K, Mg, and Sr and decreased foliage N.

Alaskan potato growers have doubled or tripled their rate of application of fertilizer over the past 15 years. At digging time potato plants are usually green and some growers have felt these higher fertilizer rates were supplying an excess of N which was delaying tuber maturity and decreasing tuber quality.


Specific Gravity Potato Foliage Fertilizer Placement Kennebec Potato White Rose Potato 


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Copyright information

© Springer 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. Laughlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Crops Research Division, ARSUSDAPalmer

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