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Economic Botany

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 266–269 | Cite as

Steroidal sapogenins. LXVIII. Their occurrence in Agave lecheguilla

  • Monroe E. Wall
  • Barton H. Warnock
  • J. J. Willaman
Article

Summary

The leaves of Agave lecheguilla, both green and dead, contained about 1.0% smilagenin, dry matter basis. The roots contained about 1.0% total genin, of which about 80% was smilagenin and the rest gitogenin. The seeds contained 1.5 to 2% hecogenin with some manogenin. Topographic sites in Brewster County, Texas, did not affect the genin content, which tended to be higher in September and October. Reactions are shown whereby smilagenin can be converted to cortisone by two different routes.

Keywords

Saponin Cortisone Diosgenin Steroidal Sapogenin Eastern Regional Research Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monroe E. Wall
    • 1
  • Barton H. Warnock
    • 2
  • J. J. Willaman
    • 3
  1. 1.Researoh Triangle InstituteDurham
  2. 2.Sul Ross State CollegeAlpine
  3. 3.Eastern Utilization Research and Development DivisionAgricultural Research Service, United States Department of AgricultureUSA

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