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Economic Botany

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 89–131 | Cite as

The utilization of marine Algae in tropical South and East Asia

  • Jacques S. Zaneveld
Article

Abstract

A review of the seaweed resources of South and East Asia may promote current research on the economic marine algae of this part of the world. The algae have to be regarded as very important in the future economy of a crowded world.

Keywords

Indian Ocean Indonesia Economic Botany Ulva Marine Alga 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques S. Zaneveld
    • 1
  1. 1.Caribbean Marine Biological Institute CuracaoNetherlands Antilles

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