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Economic Botany

, Volume 41, Issue 3, pp 403–410 | Cite as

Kewda Perfume Industry in India1

  • P. K. Dutta
  • H. O. Saxena
  • M. Brahmam
Article

Abstract

Male spadices of kewda (Pandanus fascicularis) are distilled for the production of kewda perfume. About 90% of India’s total production of this perfume is obtained from the Ganjam district of Orissa where over 30 million flowers are distilled annually. Kewda attar and kewda water, the most popular preparations of kewda perfume, are mostly used in flavouring tobacco and food. Increasing popularity of kewda perfumes in Arab countries has given impetus to this industry. The industry has been monopolized by a small group of people from northern India who organise collection of flowers and carry out their distillation, using traditionally old methods and equipment. Introduction of superior strains, adoption of improved techniques of distillation, and better organisation of collection system are some of the measures necessary to increase the production and to improve the quality of kewda perfume.

Keywords

Economic Botany Male Flower Arab Country Liquid Paraffin Regional Research Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. K. Dutta
    • 1
  • H. O. Saxena
    • 1
  • M. Brahmam
    • 1
  1. 1.Aromatic and Medicinal Plants DivisionRegional Research LaboratoryBhubaneswar - 751 013, OrissaIndia

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