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Economic Botany

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 1–10 | Cite as

Water hyacinth (eichhornia crassipes) productivity and harvesting studies

  • B. C. Wolverton
  • Rebecca C. McDonald
Article

Abstract

Water hyacinth growth rates were monitored from May through October in two sewage lagoons with different nutrient loading rates. The lagoon receiving the heaviest load sustained the highest average growth rates throughout the summer. The lightly loaded lagoon averaged a 29% increase in weight per week over the six month period with the highest growth rate occuring during June with an average weekly weight gain of 71%. The heavily loaded lagoon sustained an average growth rate of 46% per week for the same six month period with the highest measured growth rate of 73% increase in weight per week also occuring in June. In addition, the performance of three harvesters was evaluated. One harvester, consisting of a chopper and conveyor, was capable of picking up and chopping approximately 2.3 t of plants per hour and delivering them to a waiting truck. The second harvester was a single 1.52 m (5 ft) wide conveyor, and the third one was a modified clamshell bucket attached to a dragline. The average harvesting rate of each of these harvesters was approximately 9.3 t of water hyacinths per hour.

Keywords

Economic Botany Water Hyacinth Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen Oxidation Pond Vascular Aquatic Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. C. Wolverton
  • Rebecca C. McDonald
    • 1
  1. 1.National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNational Space Technology Laboratories, NSTL StationMississippi

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