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Dao

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 1–13 | Cite as

Two forms of comparative philosophy

  • Robert Cummings Neville
Article

Keywords

Western Culture Normative Approach Chinese Philosopher Objectivist Comparison Normative Comparison 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Cummings Neville
    • 1
  1. 1.School of TheologyBoston UniversityUSA

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