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American Potato Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 4, pp 111–123 | Cite as

Experimental host range of the potato spindle tuber ‘virus’

  • R. P. Singh
Article

Abstract

Two hundred thirty-two plant selections (species and varieties) were tested for susceptibility to the potato spindle tuber ‘virus’ (PSTV). One hundred thirty-eight selections were found to be susceptible to PSTV but no ‘virus’ was recovered from the remaining 94. Susceptible plants were found in the families Boraginaceae, Campanulaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Compositae, Convolvulaceae, Dipsaceae, Sapindaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae, and Valerianaceae. Most of the susceptible selections were symptomless carriers of PSTV. Visible symptoms were produced by both mild and severe strains of PSTV inLycopersicon esculentum cv. Allerfruheste-frëiland,Scopolia anomala, S. corniolica, S. lurida, S. sinensis,S. stramonifolia, S. tangutica, Solanum aviculare, andS. avicular var.albiforme; and only by the severe strain inGynura aurantica, Petunia hybrida var. Burpee Blue, andSolanum depilatum. Temperature of 21.1-22.8 C (70-73 F) with a light intensity of about 400 ft-c favored local lesion development inScopolia sinensis. S. sinensis appeared to be more susceptible than otherScopolia species.

Keywords

Potato Virus Local Lesion Test Plant Indicator Plant Severe Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Canada Department of AgricultureResearch StationFredericton

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