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Journal of Forestry Research

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 207–208 | Cite as

Response of seedlings growth ofPinus sylvestriformis to atmospheric CO2 enrichment in Changbai Mountain

  • Han Shijie
  • Wang Chenrui
  • Zhang Junhui
  • Zou Chunjing
  • Zhou Yumei
  • Wang Xiaochun
Article

Abstract

The biomass and ratio of root-shoot ofPinus sylvestriformis seedlings at CO2 concentration of 700 μL·L−1 and 500 μL·L−1 were measured using open-top chambers (OTCs) in Changbai Mountain during Jun. to Oct. in 1999. The results showed that doubling CO2 concentration was benefit to seedling growth of the species (500 μL·L−1 was better than 700 μL·L−1) and the biomass production was increased in both above-ground and underground parts of seedlings. Carbon transformation to roots was evident as rising of CO2 concentration.

Key words

Pinus sylvestriformis Biomass allocation Atmospheric CO2 enrichment 

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Copyright information

© The Editorial Board of Journal of Forestry Research All right reserved 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Han Shijie
    • 1
  • Wang Chenrui
    • 1
  • Zhang Junhui
    • 1
  • Zou Chunjing
    • 1
  • Zhou Yumei
    • 1
  • Wang Xiaochun
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Applied EcologyChinese Academy of SciencesShenyangP. R. China

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