Advertisement

American Potato Journal

, Volume 68, Issue 9, pp 569–579 | Cite as

Factors that affect the demand for potato products in the United States

  • Joseph F. Guenthner
  • Annette E. Levi
  • Biing-Hwan Lin
Article

Abstract

A demand model was developed to determine the factors that affect the demand for potato products in the United States. The following market components were analyzed: potato chips; dehydrated-foodservice; dehydrated-retail; fresh; frozen-foodservice; and frozen-retail. Equations were estimated for each of the six components via ordinary least squares. Factors found to affect demand were population, consumer price index, consumer income, consumer debt, retail potato product price, females in the labor force, percentage of households with microwave ovens, restaurant meal expenditures, price of substitute potato products, price of complement products, and advertising expenditures. The demand for all of the potato products was found to be inelastic, but fresh demand was the most inelastic.

Additional Key Words

Demand markets inelastic 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    Cardwell, Harlan T. and Bob Davis. A seasonal analysis of the U.S. potato market. College of Agricultural Science Publication No. T-l-192, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, July 1980.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Estes, Edmund A. Supply response and simulation of supply and demand for the U.S. potato industry. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Agricultural Economics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 1979.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gray, R.W., V.L. Sorenson and W.W. Cochrane. An economic analysis of the impact of government programs on the potato industry in the United States. Agr Exp Bull No 211, University of Minnesota, St. Palul, MN, 1954.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Guenthner, Joseph F. Acreage response: an econometric analysis of the United States potato industry. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Agricultural Economics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 1987.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gujarati, Damodar N. Basic econometrics. McGraw-Hill Book company, NewYork, 1988.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hee, Olman. Demand and price analysis for potatoes. USDA Tech Bull No 1380. Washington, DC, 1967.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Intrilligator, Michael D. Econometric models, techniques, and applications. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliff, New Jersey, 1978.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Johnston, J. Econometric methods. McGraw-Hill Book company, New York. 1960.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Jones, Eugene and Yang Choi. Advertising of fresh and processed potato products. Paper presented at the NEC-62 Research Conference on Commodity Advertising and Promotion, Orlando, Florida, Feb 22–23, 1989.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    National Potato Council. Potato statistical yearbook, NPC, Denver, Co., various annual issues.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Simmons, W.M. An economic study of the U.S. potato industry. USDA Econ Rept No 6, Washington, D.C. 1962.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    U.S. Bureau of Census. Statistical abstract of the United States. Washington, D.C., various annual issues.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture. Potato facts. Washington, D.C, various issues.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture. Potatoes and sweet potatoes. Washington, D.C, various issues.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Zusman, P. An econometric analysis of the market for California early potatoes. Hil-gardia 33:539–668, 1962.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph F. Guenthner
    • 1
  • Annette E. Levi
    • 1
  • Biing-Hwan Lin
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural SociologyUniversity of IdahoMoscow
  2. 2.Resources and Technology DivisionEconomic Research Service, USDARashia

Personalised recommendations