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American Potato Journal

, Volume 62, Issue 12, pp 667–672 | Cite as

Eradication of potato virus Y and S from potato by chemotherapy of cultured axillary bud tips

  • F. M. Wambugu
  • G. A. Secor
  • N. C. Gudmestad
Article

Abstract

Ribavirin (virazole) treatment of cultured axillary bud tips (3-4 mm) was tested as a method of eradicating potato virus Y (PVY) and potato virus S (PVS) from two potato cultivars, Norchip and Desiree.

Ribavirin treatment was phytotoxic at all concentrations tested, but cultivars treated at 5 mg/1 were visually similar to the nontreated control cultures after 20 weeks. The buds treated with ribavirin at 20 mg/1 had a survival rate of only 30–40%. Virus assays indicated that 2,74,82, and 89% of the plants were free of PVY, and 1, 71, 83 and 90% were free of PVS, 20 weeks following treatment with 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/1, respectively. Virus assays indicated that 2, 74, 82, 89% of the plants were free of PVY, and 1, 71, 83 and 90% were free of PVS, 20 weeks following treatment with 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/1 ribavirin treatment respectively for cultivar Norchip. Desiree cultivar assayed 2, 69, 80 and 86% free of PVY and 2, 74, 85 and 93% free of PVS, 20 weeks following treatment with 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/1 ribavirin treatment respectively.

Additional Key Words

Ribavirin virus free seedstock Solatium tuberosum 

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Copyright information

© Springer 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. M. Wambugu
    • 1
  • G. A. Secor
    • 2
  • N. C. Gudmestad
    • 2
  1. 1.Agricultural Research DepartmentKenya Agricultural Research InstituteNairobiKenya
  2. 2.Department of Plant PathologyNorth Dakota State UniversityFargo

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