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American Potato Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 86–95 | Cite as

Effects of various processing methods on free and bound amino acid contents of potatoes

  • A. S. Jaswal
Article

Abstract

The effects of various processing methods on available lysine and total and free amino acid levels of low (1.065 – 1.075) specific gravity (LSG) and high (1.095 – 1.106) specific gravity (HSG) potatoes were investigated.

LSG potatoes after canning and chip making showed approximately 40% loss of total amino acid contents. Such losses in drum dried potatoes were approximately 20% and that of french fries 4.5%. All processing methods adversely affected the available lysine content; chips and canned potatoes showing the maximum loss, followed by drum dried and french fried potatoes.

Losses in HSG potato products showed a trend similar to that of LSG material, but on a considerably reduced scale.

Keywords

Free Amino Acid Specific Gravity Amino Acid Content Total Amino Acid High Specific Gravity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. Jaswal
    • 1
  1. 1.The Research and Productivity CouncilFrederictonCanada

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