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Effect of algae and water on water color shift

  • Yang Shengguang
  • Xia Daying
  • Yang Xiaolong
  • Zhao Jun
Article

Abstract

This study showed that the combined effect of absorption of planktonic algae and water on water color shift can be simulated approximately by the exponential function: Log(E 100cm W +E 100cm Xch1 )=0.002λ−2.5 whereE 100 cm W ,E 100cm Xchl are, respectively, extinction coefficients of seawater and chlorophyll—a (concentration is equal toX mg/m3), and λ (nm) is wavelength.

This empirical regression equation is very useful for forecasting the relation between water color and biomass in water not affected by terrigenous material. The main factor affecting water color shift in the ocean should be the absorption of blue light by planktonic algae.

Keywords

Water Color Phaeodactylum Tricornutum Planktonic Alga Specific Absorption Coefficient Alga Pigment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Science Press 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yang Shengguang
    • 1
  • Xia Daying
    • 1
  • Yang Xiaolong
    • 1
  • Zhao Jun
    • 2
  1. 1.First Institute of OceanographySOAQingdao
  2. 2.Ocean University of QingdaoQingdaoChina

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