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Pramana

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 373–385 | Cite as

An automated laboratory EXAFS spectrometer of Johansson type: indigenous development and testing

  • S K Deshpande
  • S M Chaudhari
  • Ashok Pimpale
  • A S Nigavekar
  • S B Ogale
  • V G Bhide
Article

Abstract

An automated linear laboratory EXAFS spectrometer of the Johansson type has been indigenously developed. Only two translational motions are required to achieve the necessary Rowland circle configuration for the (fixed) X-ray source, the dispersing and focusing bent crystal and the receiving slit. With the available crystals the spectral region from 5 to 25 keV can be scanned. The linear motions of the crystal and receiving slit including the detector assembly are achieved by employing software-controlled DC motors and utilizing optical encoders for position sensing. The appropriate rotation of the crystal is achieved by the geometry of the instrument. There is a facility to place the sample alternately in the path of the X-ray beam and out of the path to record both the incident X-ray intensityI 0 and the transmitted intensityI employing the scintillation detector. An arrangement with a two-window proportional detector before the sample to measureI 0 and the scintillation detector to recordI is also developed; in this case it is not necessary to oscillate the sample. Fast electronic circuits are employed to minimize counting errors. The instrument is user-friendly and it is operated through a menu-driven IBM compatible PC. EXAFS spectra of high resolution have been recorded using the spectrometer and employing the Si(111) reflecting planes; the X-ray source being a Rigaku 12 kW rotating anode with Cu target. We describe the spectrometer and discuss its performance with a few representative spectra.

Keywords

EXAFS spectrometer Johansson type 

PACS Nos

07.85 82.80 

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Copyright information

© the Indian Academy of Sciences 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S K Deshpande
    • 1
  • S M Chaudhari
    • 1
  • Ashok Pimpale
    • 1
  • A S Nigavekar
    • 1
  • S B Ogale
    • 1
  • V G Bhide
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of PoonaPuneIndia

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