Advertisement

Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 177–182 | Cite as

Determination of apparent sampling thickness of sea surface microlayer

  • Li Jun
  • Ding Hai-bing
  • Wu Zhi-jian
  • Zhang Zheng-bin
  • Liu Lian-sheng
Article

Abstract

In situ and laboratory studies of sea—surface microlayer sampling methods using glass plate, rotating drum, screen and funnel samplers were conducted. For glass plate and rotating drum samplers, surface microlayer samples of different thickness were collected by controlling their withdrawal rate and rotating rate. The relationships between pH, surface tension, the concentration of dissolved trace metals Cu and Pb, phosphate, particulate matters and sampling thickness were carefully investigated. It was shown that physicochemical and biological properties change obviously at the sampling thickness of about 50 μm, which is consistent with the mean thickness of the boundary film in the models of gas exchange across the sea surface. It is proposed that the apparent sampling thickness of the surface microlayer should be less than 40 μm. The factors affecting the sampling thickness are discussed, and the feasibility and applicable conditions for different sampling methods are evaluated.

Key word

sea surface microlayer glass plate rotating drum apparent sampling thickness 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baier, R. E., Groupil, D. W., Perlmutter, S. et al., 1974. Dominant chemical composition of sea—surface films, natural slicks, and foams.J. Rech. Atoms. 8: 571–600.Google Scholar
  2. Carlson, D. J., 1982. A field evaluation of plate and screen microlayer sampling techniques.Mar. Chem. 11: 189–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Daumas, R. A., Laborde, P. L., Marty, J. C. et al., 1976. Influence of sampling method on the chemical composition on water surface films.Limnol. Oceanogr.,21:319–326.Google Scholar
  4. Garret, W. D., 1965. Collection of slick forming materials from the surface of the sea.Limnol. Oceanogr. 10: 602–605.Google Scholar
  5. Hardy, J. T. 1982. The sea surface microlayer: biology, chemistry and anthropogenic enrichment.Prog. Oceanog. 11: 307–328.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Harvey, G. W., 1966. Microlayer collection from the surface of the sea.Limnol. Oceanog. 11: 608–613.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Harvey, G. W., Apts, C. W., Crecelius, E. A. et al., 1985. Sea—surface microlayer metals enrichments in an Urban and Rural Bay.Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science.20: 299–312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Morris, R. J., 1974. Lipid composition of surface films and zooplankton from the eastern Mediterranean.Mar. Pollut. Bull. 5: 105–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Peng, T. H., Broecker, W. S., Mathieu, G. G. et al., 1979. Radon evasion rates in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans as determined during the GEOSECS program.J. Geophys. Res. 84: 2471–2486.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Piotrowicz, S. R., Ray, B. J., Hoffman, G. L. et al., 1972. Trace metal enrichment in the sea—surface microlayer.J. Geophys. Res. 77: 5243–5254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Tsunogai, S., Tanaka, N., 1980. Flux of oxygen across air—sea interface as determined by the analysis of dissolved components in sea water.Geochem. J. 14: 227–234.Google Scholar
  12. Williams, P. M., Carlucci, A. F., Henfichos, S. M. et al., 1986. Chemical and microbiological studies of sea—surface films in the southem Gulf of California and off the west coast of California.Mar. Chem. 19: 17–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Zhang Zhengbin, Niu Zengyuan, Yang Guipeng et al., 1996. Studies of Chemical Processes of Nansha Island Waters. Science Press. Beijing, 152 p.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science Press 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Jun
    • 1
  • Ding Hai-bing
    • 1
  • Wu Zhi-jian
    • 1
  • Zhang Zheng-bin
    • 1
  • Liu Lian-sheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Ocean University of QingdaoQingdao

Personalised recommendations