Advertisement

Sports Engineering

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 147–153 | Cite as

A method for personalising the blade size for competitors in flatwater kayaking

  • Eric Sprigings
  • Peter McNair
  • Grant Mawston
  • David Sumner
  • Mark Boocock
Article

Abstract

The intent of this project was to explore the feasibility of personalising the paddle blade size for individual flatwater kayakers based on their power output profiles. Twelve elite male kayakers performed on a kayak ergometer at the same intensity and resistance that they would normally experience while paddling at race pace for 500 m on the water. The kayak ergometer was instrumented so that power profiles could be determined from the instantaneous force and velocity of the representative centre point of the paddle blade. From the power profile information, the researchers calculated a personalised blade size that was expected to improve performance for those kayakers differing more than 5% from the calculated ‘ideal’ size. For the elite kayakers studied, it was recommended that seven of the paddlers should increase their blade size by approximately 5–10%. For the remaining five paddlers, the results indicated that their current blade sizes were within the expected measurement error of their predicted ideal value and should be retained. It is anticipated that this research will provide the theoretical rationale for elite kayakers to see the need to personalise their blade size based on their own muscle power profiles.

Keywords

drag flatwater kayaking muscle power paddle blade 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aitken, D., & Neal, R. (1992) An on-water analysis system for quantifying stroke force characteristics during kayak events.International Journal of Sport Biomechanics,8, 165–173.Google Scholar
  2. Dal Monte, A., & Leonardi, L. (1976) Functional evaluation of kayak paddlers from biomechanical and physiological viewpoints. In:Biomechanics V-B. (ed: Komi, P.), International Series on Biomechanics, Vol. 1B. University Park Press, Baltimore, pp 258–270.Google Scholar
  3. Edgerton, V., Roy, R., Gregor, R., & Rugg, S. (1986) Morphological basis of skeletal muscle power output. In:Human Muscle Power (eds: Jones, N., McCartney, N., & McComas, A.). Human Kinetic Publishers, Champaign, Il. pp 43–64.Google Scholar
  4. Faulkner, J., Clafin, D., & McCully, K. (1986) Power output of fast and slow fibers from human skeletal muscles. In:Human Muscle Power (eds: Jones, N., McCartney, N., & McComas, A.). Human Kinetic Publishers, Champaign, Il. pp 81–94.Google Scholar
  5. Hull, M., Gonzalez, H., & Redfield, R. (1988) Optimization of pedaling rate in cycling using a muscle stress-based objective function.International Journal of Sport Biomechanics,4, 1–20.Google Scholar
  6. Kendal, S., & Sanders, R. (1992) The technique of elite flatwater kayak paddlers using the wing paddle.International Journal of Sport Biomechanics,8, 233–250.Google Scholar
  7. Mann, R., & Kearney, J. (1980) A biomechanical analysis of the Olympic style flatwater kayak stroke.Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise,12, 183–188.Google Scholar
  8. Plagenhoef, S. (1979) Biomechanical analysis of Olympic flatwater kayaking and canoeing.The Research Quarterly,50, 443–459.Google Scholar
  9. Sumner, D., Sprigings, E., Bugg, J., & Heseltine, J. (2003) Fluid forces on kayak paddle blades of different design.Sports Engineering,6, 11–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© isea 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Sprigings
    • 1
  • Peter McNair
    • 2
  • Grant Mawston
    • 2
  • David Sumner
    • 3
  • Mark Boocock
    • 2
  1. 1.College of KinesiologyUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Physical Rehabilitation Research CentreAuckland University of TechnologyNew Zealand
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of SaskatchewanCanada

Personalised recommendations