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Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 262–270 | Cite as

Chemical mass transfer from the Changjiang River to the sea

I. Origin and transfer of major dissolved constituents in the water of the Changjiang River’s lower reaches
  • Li Yan
  • Wang Xuchen
Article
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

  1. 1.

    The nonanthropogenic SO4 in the Changjiang River stems from weathering and oxidation of sulphate and sulphite minerals, while the anthropogenic SO4 here is attributed to acid rain containing H2SO4 formed by atmospheric sulphur oxides derived from the burning of fossil fuels in the region of the lower reaches. Ca and Mg are probably derived from weathering of carbonate minerals, but possibly less from weathering of silicate minerals.

     
  2. 2.

    The Changjiang River estuary is characterized by two—layer flow based on the salinity section of the estuary, so a model of two—layer exchange of water—body in the Changjiang River estuary can be advanced.

     
  3. 3.

    The presence of SO4 and K at stations H14 and H15 were found most likely to be due to the addition and removal processes, that of the other major consituents may be mainly controlled by physical mixing in this estuary.

     

Keywords

Pore Water River Estuary Acid Rain Layer Exchange Chemical Weathering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Science Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Yan
    • 1
  • Wang Xuchen
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of OceanologyAcademia SinicaQingdao

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