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Total electron content at low latitudes

  • Malkiat Singh
  • H S Gurm
  • M R Deshpande
  • R G Rastogi
  • G Sethia
  • A R Jain
  • A V Janve
  • R K Rai
  • V M Patwari
  • B S Subbarao
Article
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

Radio beacon from ATS-6 at 140 MHz was used to measure the changes in the polarization angle (Faraday rotation) at Bombay, Rajkot, Ahmedabad, Udaipur and Patiala during October 1975 to July 1976. In this paper, results of diurnal, seasonal and latitudinal variations in total electron content (TEC) derived from these measurements are reported. The amplitude of diurnal peak is found to be higher at Rajkot, Ahmedabad and Udaipur as compared to that at Patiala or Bombay, indicating that the peak of Appleton anomaly in the latitudinal variation of TEC was close to the latitude of Ahmedabad. The diurnal maximum of TEC occurs around the same time during summer and winter months. The peak electron content shows a semiannual variation at all the stations with large values in equinoxes as compared to winter and summer. The TEC at Bombay shows a seasonal anamoly with high values in winter as compared to summer. The paper describes the development of latitudinal anomaly with the time of the day for different seasons. This anomaly is maximum during 1000 to 1800 LT and is located between 12° and 14° N (dip latitude) in summer and equinoxes and at about 10°N in winter.

Keywords

Ionospheric electron content equatorialF region anomaly 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malkiat Singh
    • 1
  • H S Gurm
    • 1
  • M R Deshpande
    • 2
  • R G Rastogi
    • 2
  • G Sethia
    • 2
  • A R Jain
    • 3
  • A V Janve
    • 4
  • R K Rai
    • 4
  • V M Patwari
    • 5
  • B S Subbarao
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsPunjabi UniversityPatiala
  2. 2.Physical Research LaboratoryAhmedabad
  3. 3.Indian Institute of GeomagnetismBombay
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsUniversity of UdaipurUdaipur
  5. 5.AV Parekh Technical InstituteRajkot

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