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Fabrication and mechanical properties of TiC/TiAl composites

  • Yue Yun-long
  • Gong Yan-sheng
  • Wu Hai-tao
  • Wang Chuan-bin
  • Zhang Lian-meng
Article

Abstract

TiC/TiAl composites with different TiC content were fabricated by rapid heating technique of spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effect of TiC particles on microstructure and mechanical properties of TiAl matrix was investigated. The results indicate that grain sizes of TiAl matrix decrease and mechanical properties are improved because of the addition of TiC particles. The composites display a 26.8% increase in bending strength when 10wt% TiC is added and 43.8% improvement in fracture toughness when 5wt% TiC is added compared to values of TiC-free materials. Grain-refinement and dispersion-strengthening were the main strengthening mechanism. The improvement of fracture toughness was due to the deflexion of TiC particles to the crack.

Key words

TiC/TiAl composites mechanical properties SPS sintering technique 

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Copyright information

© Editorial Office of Journal of Wuhan University of Technology-Materials Science Edition 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yue Yun-long
    • 2
    • 1
  • Gong Yan-sheng
    • 2
  • Wu Hai-tao
    • 2
  • Wang Chuan-bin
    • 1
  • Zhang Lian-meng
    • 1
  1. 1.Wuhan University of TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Jinan UniversityJinanChina

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