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Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 175–179 | Cite as

Effect of traditional Chinese medicine on survival and quality of life in patients with esophageal carcinoma after esophagectomy

  • Lu Ping
  • Liang Qiu-dong
  • Li Rong
  • Niu Hong-rui
  • Kou Xiao-ge
  • Xi Hong-jun
Original Articles

Abstract

Objective: To explore the effect and possible mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on survival and quality of life (QOL) in patients with esophageal carcinoma after esophagectomy.Methods: Adopting prospective controlled method of study, the authors had 128 post-esophagectomy patients, hospitalized from February 2001 to February 2002, randomly divided into 3 groups: the TCM group, treated with TCM drugs alone; the chemotherapy group, with chemotherapy alone applied; and the synthetic group, treated with chemotherapy combined with Chinese medicine. Their survival rate and QOL were compared.Results: In the TCM group, the chemotherapy group and the synthetic group, the respective 3-year relapse and remote metastasis rate were 71.4%, 76.7%, 53.4%, respectively (x2 = 6.53,P < 0.05); the 1-year survival rate 42.9%, 46.5%, 72.1 %; 2-year survival rate 28.6%, 27.9%, 55.8%, and 3-year survival rate 26. 2%, 23. 1%, 37. 2%, respectively. And the QOL improving rate was 69. 0%, 37. 2%, 58.1%, respectively, all showing significant difference among them (x2 = 6. 10, allP < 0.05). Moreover, immune function was increased in the TCM and the synthetic groups.Conclusion: Integrative Chinese and Western medicinal treatment was the beneficial choice for post-operational patients with esophageal carcinoma. However, long time use of simple Chinese medicine was also advisable, especially for those in poverty.

Key words

post-esophagectomy traditional Chinese drug therapy quality of life survival rate 

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Copyright information

© CATWM_Beijing 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lu Ping
    • 1
  • Liang Qiu-dong
    • 1
  • Li Rong
    • 1
  • Niu Hong-rui
    • 1
  • Kou Xiao-ge
    • 1
  • Xi Hong-jun
    • 1
  1. 1.Oncology Departmentthe First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical CollegeHenan

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