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Journal of Materials Shaping Technology

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 23–33 | Cite as

Empirical and finite element approaches to forging die design: A state-of-the-art survey

  • I. Haque
  • J. E. Jackson
  • T. Gangjee
  • A. Raikar
Article

Abstract

A survey of research concerned with the use of computer-aided techniques to simulate the forging process and design forging dies is presented here. Attention is focused on finite element models and empirical guidelines that have been developed in this connection.

Keywords

Metal Flow Metal Form Material Shaping Technology Preform Design Metal Form Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Haque
    • 1
  • J. E. Jackson
    • 1
  • T. Gangjee
    • 1
  • A. Raikar
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringClemson UniversityClemsonUSA
  2. 2.Alcoa, Technical Center, Alcoa CenterUSA

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