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The journal of mental health administration

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 4–7 | Cite as

Improving the record-keeping performance of direct service personnel

  • Walter P. Christian
  • Mary B. Norris
  • Stephen R. Anderson
  • Priscilla A. Blew
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

Record review procedures and contingent performance feedback were used to monitor and improve the record-keeping performance of human service staff in a behavioral residential treatment setting. A multiple baseline design was employed across three groups of B.A.-level human service personnel. The study consisted of five conditions: (1) Baseline 1; (2) Written Instruction·(memoranda); (3) Written Performance Feedback; (4) Verbal Performance Feedback; and (5) Baseline 2 (return to the Baseline 1 condition). Dependent measures included highly reliable ratings by independent observers of the (1) essential documents present in case records, (2) documents appropriately located/organized in case records, and (3) an overall rating of documents present, correctly organized, signed and dated, and not duplicated in the records. Results indicated that the procedures most frequently used to provide feedback to human services personnel—meetings, policy and procedure mannuals, and/or written memoranda—were not as effective as verbal feedback sessions in prompting staff participation in case record maintenance. Findings were interpreted to suggest that, with adequate training, supervision, and performance appraisal, direct service personnel in residential treatment settings can effectively manage clients' case records and become more involved in, and committed to, accountability and quality control.

Keywords

Case Record Apply Behavior Analysis Performance Appraisal Service Personnel Review Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association of Mental Health Administrators 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter P. Christian
    • 2
  • Mary B. Norris
    • 2
  • Stephen R. Anderson
    • 1
  • Priscilla A. Blew
    • 1
  1. 1.the May InstituteChatham
  2. 2.Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasUSA

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