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Getting the most from program consultation: Guidelines for mental health administrators

  • Thomas E. Backer
  • Margaret E. Grant
Article
  • 11 Downloads

Conclusions

An unsuccessful consulting intervention is often to an extent the result of unmet or uncommunicated expectations of the mental health administrator as to the what, when, where, and how of the consultation. while following the preceding guidelines is no guarantee of success, the evidence is clear, both from research (such as the Larsen study) and the experience of practitioners (such as Swift, 1981), that active planning and participating in consulting efforts by mental health administrators and their staffs greatly increases the chance for impact. When dollars for consulting are few, and the need for consulting services is great, the extra effort such involvement entails merits serious consideration.

Keywords

Mental Health Community Mental Health Center Management Consultant Consult Service Mental Health Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© the Association of Mental Health Administrators 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas E. Backer
  • Margaret E. Grant
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Interaction Research InstituteLos Angeles

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