Advertisement

Micropropagation ofUraria picta, a medicinal plant, through axillary bud culture and callus regeneration

  • Ajith Anand
  • C. Srinivasa Rao
  • R. Latha
  • P. C. Josekutty
  • P. Balakrishna
Micropropagation

Summary

Micropropagation ofUraria picta, a leguminous herb, was achieved through axillary bud culture and nodal callus culture. Bud break was best when nodes were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (1962) (MS) medium supplemented with 2.6 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid and 4.4 μM N6-benzyladenine. Optimum shoot multiplication was observed in adenine sulphate at 2.47 μM concentration. Competent callus was initiated around the nodal ring of the explant on the basal medium supplemented with cytokinins and auxin (α-naphthalene acetic acid and N6-benzyladenine), which regenerated into new profusely growing shoots on transferring to 0.13 μM N6-benzyladenine. Shoots elongated to 5 node length with 1.11 μM N6-benzyladenine were rooted on half-strength MS basal medium. The rooted plants were successfully established with 80% survival. About 400 such plants were transferred to the field.

Key words

bioprospecting conservation organogenesis plant-tissue culture 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, O. N.; Allen, K. E. The leguminosae. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press; 1981:672–673.Google Scholar
  2. Anonymous. In: The wealth of India. Raw materials Vol. 10 New Delhi. Publication and Information Directorate, CSIR; 1976:443.Google Scholar
  3. Bajaj, Y.P.S. Biotechnology in agriculture and forestry. Vol. 1. Trees. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag; 1986.Google Scholar
  4. Bressan, P. H.; Kirh, Y. J.; Hyndman, S. E., et al. Factors affecting in vitro propagation of rose. J. Am. Soc. Hortic. Sci. 107:979–990; 1982.Google Scholar
  5. Cheng, T. Y.; Saka, H.; Voqui-Dinh, T. H. Plant regeneration from soybean cotyledonary node segments in culture. Plant Sci. Lett. 19:91–99; 1980.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Feinsilver, J. M. In: Zakri, A. H., ed. Biodiversity prospecting: prospects and realities. Genetics Society of Malaysia. Universiti Kebangsaan, Selangor, Malaysia; 1995:21–58.Google Scholar
  7. Huetteman, C. A.; Preece, J. E. Thidiazuron: a potent cytokinin for woody plant tissue. Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 33:105–119; 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Jain, S. K.; Defilipps, R. A. Medical plants of India. Vol. 1. Alganao, MI: Reference Publication; 1991:342.Google Scholar
  9. Kartha, K. K. In: Kartha, K. K. ed. Cryopreservation of plant cells and organs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1985:115–134.Google Scholar
  10. Kartha, K. K.; Pahl, K.; Leung, N. L., et al. Plant regeneration from meristems of grain legumes: soybean, cowpea, peanut, chickpea and bean. Can. J. Bot. 59:1671–1679; 1981.Google Scholar
  11. Malik, K. A.; Saxena, P. K. Somatic embryogenesis and shoot regeneration from intact seedlings of Phaseolus actifolius A., P. aureus L., Wilczek, P. coccineaus L., and P. wrightii L. Plant Cell Rep. 11:163–168; 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Murashige, T.; Skoog, F. A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassay with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol. Plant. 15:473–479; 1962.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Vaquero, F.; Rubles, C.; Ruz, M. L. A method for long-term micropropagation of Phaseolus coccineus L. Plant Cell Rep. 12:395–398; 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society for In Vitro Biology 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ajith Anand
    • 1
  • C. Srinivasa Rao
    • 1
  • R. Latha
    • 1
  • P. C. Josekutty
    • 1
  • P. Balakrishna
    • 1
  1. 1.M S Swaminathan Research FoundationMadrasIndia

Personalised recommendations