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Optimizing conditions for DNA isolation fromPinus radiata

  • Ewa Ostrowska
  • Morley Muralitharan
  • Stephen Chandler
  • Peter Volker
  • Sandra Hetherington
  • Frank Dunshea
Genetic Transformation/Somatic Cell Genetics Technical Review

Summary

Genomic DNA was isolated fromin vitro Pinus radiata seedling with five DNA isolation protocols commonly used for pines. The methods described by Jobes et al. (1995) and Nelson et al. (1994) utilize sodium dodecyl sulfate, whereas those of Murray and Thompson (1980), Doyle and Doyle (1990), and Devey et al. (1996) use cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide for cell lysis. The quality and quantity of the isolated DNA was measured and compared. Lithium chloride was found to be more effective than RNase for minimizing the amount of RNA present in the solution. Protocols described by Jobes et al. (1995) and Devey et al. (1996) yielded a large quantity of pure DNA which was suitable for restriction enzyme digestion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. With these methods, 37 to 79 μg of DNA with an A260/280 ratio between 1.7 and 1.9 was obtained from 1 g ofPinus radiata seedlings grownin vitro.

Key words

conifer genomic DNA purity needles CTAB SDS 

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Copyright information

© Society for In Vitro Biology 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewa Ostrowska
    • 1
    • 2
  • Morley Muralitharan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephen Chandler
    • 4
  • Peter Volker
    • 5
  • Sandra Hetherington
    • 5
  • Frank Dunshea
    • 1
  1. 1.Agriculture VictoriaWerribeeAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Chemical SciencesVictoria University of TechnologySt. AlbansAustralia
  3. 3.School of AgricultureCharles Sturt UniversityWagga WaggaAustralia
  4. 4.FlorigeneCollingwoodAustralia
  5. 5.ANM Forest ManagementNew NorfolkAustralia

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