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TechTrends

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 15–23 | Cite as

Grounded constructions and how technology can help

  • Sasha A. Barab
  • Kenneth E. Hay
  • Thomas M. Duffy
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Keywords

American Educational Research Association Situate Cognition Bank Teller Conceptual Database Virtual Reality Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sasha A. Barab
  • Kenneth E. Hay
  • Thomas M. Duffy

There are no affiliations available

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