Advertisement

Audiovisual communication review

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 423–450 | Cite as

Research on film use: Student participation

  • William H. Allen
Articles

Keywords

Student Participation Mental Practice Wiring Board Film Showing Russian Word 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Allen, William H. “Research on Film Use: Class Preparation.”Audio-Visual Communication Review 3: 183–96; Summer 1955.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ash, Philip, andCarlton, Bruce J.The Value of Note-Taking During Film Learning. Technical Report SDC 269-7-21, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College, Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, November 1951. 10 p.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ash, Philip, andJaspen, Nathan.Optimum Physical Viewing Conditions for a Rear Projection Daylight Screen. Technical Report SDC 269-7-37, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, October 1953. 17 p.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Carpenter, C. R. “Psychological Concepts and Audio-Visual Instruction.”Audio-Visual Communication Review 5: 361–69; Winter 1957.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gibson, James J., editor.Motion Picture Testing and Research. Army Air Forces Aviation Psychology Program Research Reports, No. 7. Washington, D. C.: Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, 1947. 267 p.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hall, W. J. “A Study of Three Methods of Teaching Science with Classroom Films.”School Science and Mathematics 36: 968–70; 1936.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Harby, S. F.Evaluation of a Procedure for Using Daylight Projection of Film Loops in Teaching Skills. Human Engineering Report SDC 269-7-25, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, May 1952. 11 p.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Harby, S. F.Comparison of Mental Practice and Physical Practice in the Learning of Physical Skills. Human Engineering Report SDC 269-7-27, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, June 1952. 11 p.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hirsch, Richard S.The Effects of Knowledge of Test Results on Learning of Meaningful Material. Human Enginering Report SDC 269-7-30, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, September 1952. 27 p.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hoban, Charles F., jr., andvan Ormer, Edward B.Instructional Film Research, 1918–1950. Technical Report No. SDC 269-7-19, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, December 1950. 180 p.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hovland, Carl I. Lumsdaine, Arthur A.; andSheffield, Fred D.Experiments on Mass Communication. Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1949. 345 p.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Jaspen, Nathan.Effects on Training of Experimental Film Variables, Study II: Verbalization, “How-It-Works,” Nomenclature, Audience Participation, and Succinct Treatment. Technical Report SDC 269-7-11, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, March 1950. 13 p.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kale, S. V., andGrosslight, J. H.Exploratory Studies in the Use of Pictures and Sound for Teaching Foreign Language Vocabulary. Technical Report SDC 269-7-53, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State University. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, August 1955. 57 p.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kendler, Tracy S. ; Cook, John O.; andKendler, Howard H. “An Investigation of the Interacting Effects of Repetition and Audience Participation on Learning from Training Films” (Abstract)The American Psychologist. 8:378–79; August 1953.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kurtz, Albertk. ; Walter, Jeanette S.; andBrenner, Henry.The Effects of Inserted Questions and Statements on Film Learning. Technical Report SDC 269-7-16, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, September 1950. 15 p.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kurtz, Kenneth H., andHovland, Carl I. “The effect of Verbalization During Observation of Stimulus Objects upon Accuracy of Recognition and Recall.”Journal of Experimental Psychology 45: 157–64; March 1953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Levine, Seymour. “The Role of Motivation in the Effects of ’Active Review’ on Learning from a Factual Film.” (Abstract)The American Psychologist 8: 388–89; August 1953.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    MC Geoch, John A., andIrion, Arthur L.The Psychology of Human Learning. New York: Longmans, Green and Company, 1952.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Michael, Donald N.Some Factors Influencing the Effects of Audience Participation on Learning from a Factual Film. HRRL Memo Report No. 13A, Revised report. Washington, D. C.: U. S. Air Force, Human Resources Research Laboratories, Headquarters Command, Boiling Air Force Base, December 1951. 46 p. 20. MURNIN, J. a.; vandermeer, A. w.; and VRIS, T.Comparison of Training Media: Trainee Manipulation and Observation of Functioning Electrical Systems Versus Trainee Drawing of Schematic Electrical Systems. Technical Report SDC 269-7-101, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State University. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y. : Special Devices Center, June 1954. 30 p.Google Scholar
  20. 21.
    Patterson, Pierce E.Teaching the Operation of a Motion Picture Projector by the Use of a Sound Film and Visualization. Master’s thesis. Calif.: San Diego State College. 1953. Typewritten.Google Scholar
  21. 22.
    Rimland, Bernard.Effectiveness of Several Methods of Repetition of Films. Technical Report SDC 269-7-45, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State University. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, May 1955. 25 p.Google Scholar
  22. 23.
    Roshal, Sol M.Effects of Learner Representation in Film-Mediated Perceptual-Motor Learning. Technical Report SDC 269-7-5, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College. Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, December 1949. 38 p.Google Scholar
  23. 24.
    Slattery, Sister M. Jamesetta.An Appraisal of the Effectiveness of Selected Instructional Sound Motion Pictures and Silent Filmstrips in Elementary School Instruction. Washington, D. C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1953. 67 p.Google Scholar
  24. 25.
    Stein, J.J.The Effect of a Pre-Film Test on Learning from an Educational Sound Motion Picture. Human Engineering Report SDC 269-7-35, Instructional Film Research Program, Pennsylvania State College, Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y.: Special Devices Center, November 1952. 15 p.Google Scholar
  25. 26.
    Vernon, P. E. “An Experiment on the Value of the Film and Film-Strip in the Instruction of Adults.”British Journal of Educational Psychology 16: 149–62; November 1946.Google Scholar
  26. 27.
    Yale University Motion Picture Research Project. “Do ‘Motivation’ and ‘Participation’ Questions Increase Learning?”Educational Screen 26: 256–59,274,283; May 1947.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1957

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Allen
    • 1
  1. 1.System Development DivisionThe RAND CorporationSanta MonicaUSA

Personalised recommendations