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Molecular and Chemical Neuropathology

, Volume 28, Issue 1–3, pp 175–179 | Cite as

Effects of chronic infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in AF64A-Lesioned rats

  • Caridad Ivette Fernández
  • Odalys González
  • Johanka Soto
  • Lázaro Alvarez
  • Zenaida Quijano
Part VIII Therapeutic Strategies

Abstract

We report here the behavioral and biochemical recovery induced by the nerve growth factor (NGF) administration in AF64A-treated rats. Retention in the passive avoidance test was affected by lesion but it was significantly improved after the NGF treatment. Similar results were observed in the performance during the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Remarkable losses in the ChAT activity were detected in some brain regions from lesioned rats. The NGF-induced alleviation of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity losses and cognitive functions suggest a trophic and protective action on the remaining cholinergic neurons after the lesion. Thus NGF therapy could be considered as a possibility mainly in the early course of Alzheimer disease.

Index Entries

ChAT activity AF64A NGF septo-hippocampal pathway learning and memory 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caridad Ivette Fernández
    • 1
  • Odalys González
    • 1
  • Johanka Soto
    • 1
  • Lázaro Alvarez
    • 1
  • Zenaida Quijano
    • 1
  1. 1.Basic DivisionInternational Center of Neurological RestorationHavanaCuba

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