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Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 481–484 | Cite as

Phytase fromAspergillus niger

  • O. Volfová
  • J. Dvořáková
  • A. Hanzlíková
  • A. Jandera
Pages

Abstract

132 microorganisms, isolates from soil and decayed fruits, were tested for phytase production. All isolates intensively producing active extracellular phytase were of fungal origin. The most active fungal isolates with phytase activity were identified asAspergillus niger. At the end of the growth phase, the extracellular phytase activity produced byA. niger strain 92 was 132 nkat/mL, with strain 89 it was 53 nkat/mL. In both strains the extracellular enzyme activity exhibited two marked activity optima at pH 1.8 and 5.0 and a temperature optimum at 55°C.

Keywords

Phytic Acid Corn Starch Phytase Activity Extracellular Enzyme Activity Phytase Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Folia Microbiol 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Volfová
    • 1
  • J. Dvořáková
    • 1
  • A. Hanzlíková
    • 1
  • A. Jandera
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of MicrobiologyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicPrague

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