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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 227–244 | Cite as

Particle circulation and oxygen mass transfer in an immobilized cell bioreactor

  • Jonathan F. Dean
  • Colin Webb
Article

Abstract

Two important considerations in the design of an aerobic particulate immobilized cell bioreactor are the provision of sufficient oxygen to maintain the desired metabolism of the immobilized organism, and the biomass holdup (which is proportional to the number of immobilized cell particles in the reactor).

The Circulating Bed Reactor, a reactor developed for use with those forms of immobilization that result in particles of essentially neutral buoyancy, operates with an expanded bed of circulating particles. The particle number density attainable in such a reactor has been found to be dependent upon the circulation cell aspect ratio, the individual particle properties, the static bed voidage of the particles, and the superficial gas velocity. The oxygen mass transfer characteristics have been found to be dependent upon the circulatory nature of the system, the particle (solids) holdup, the particle porosity, and the superficial gas velocity.

Index Entries

Particle circulation, in an immobilized cell bioreactor oxygen mass transfer, in an immobilized cell bioreactor 

Nomenclature

a

Specific interfacial area for mass transfer. L-1

Cl*

Equilibrium oxygen concentration in the liquid. ML-3

Cl

Bulk liquid oxygen concentration. ML-3

db

Sauter mean bubble diameter. L

kL

Liquid film mass transfer coefficient. LT-1

kLa

Volumetric mass transfer coefficient. T-1

mp

Mean biomass holdup within an immobilized cell particle. M

NL

Oxygen transfer rate based on liquid volume. ML-3T-1

Np

Number of immobilized cell particles within a bioreactor. —

NR

Oxygen transfer rate based on reactor volume. ML-3T-1

NS

Oxygen transfer rate based on solids volume. ML-3T-1

Rp

Mean specific rate of reaction of immobilized biomass. T-1

Rv

Volumetric rate of reaction of a chemical reactor. ML-3 T-1

Ubs

Bubble rise velocity. LT-1

Ug

Superficial gas velocity. LT-1

Ut

Terminal velocity. LT-1

Vp

Particle volume. L3

VR

Reactor volume. L3

εg

Mean volumetric gas holdup. —

εsa

Apparent solids holdup. —

εs

Actual solids holdup. —

φ

Fraction of base area of circulating bed used for aeration. —

ψ

Particle porosity. —

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan F. Dean
    • 1
  • Colin Webb
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringU.M.I.S. T.ManchesterEngland

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