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In Vitro

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 377–381 | Cite as

Monoclonal antibodies specific for cell culture mycoplasmas

  • David W. Buck
  • Roger H. Kennett
  • Gerard McGarrity
Article

Summary

Mycoplasma infection of cell cultures is still a major problem in some laboratories. Although several methods can be used for their detection, identification is normally by serological procedures. As no commercial source for the necessary antibodies is available we have prepared monoclonal antibodies to the five mycoplasma species that account for the majority of cell culture infections. These antibodies have been characterized by the growth inhibition test (GIT), immunofluorescence, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and have shown perfect correlation in all tests when compared to conventional antisera raised in rabbits or donkeys. In addition, a monoclonal antibody toMycoplasma pneumoniae was produced.M. pneumoniae is an infrequent cell culture contaminant but is a human pathogen, and the monoclonal antibody described here could be useful in the clinical diagnosis ofM. pneumoniae infection in man.

Key words

mycoplasma monoclonal antibodies detection speciation 

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Copyright information

© Society for In Vitro Biology 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David W. Buck
    • 1
    • 2
  • Roger H. Kennett
    • 2
  • Gerard McGarrity
    • 2
  1. 1.Cetus CorporationBerkeley
  2. 2.Cell Center of University of Pennsylvania Human Genetics Center, and Institute for Medical ResearchCamden

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