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Sophia

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 41–52 | Cite as

Augustine and absolute creation

  • David Werther
Article
  • 33 Downloads

Keywords

Theistic Activism Divine Nature Divine Property Divine Simplicity Platonic View 
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References

  1. 1.
    Rene' Descartes,Replies to the Fifth Objection, quoted from Anthony Kenny,The God of the Philosophers (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1979), p. 18.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Von Leibniz,Monadology, No. 46 inMonadology and Other Philosophical Essay trans. Paul Schrecker and Anne Marsha Schrecker (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril Educational Publishing, 1980), p. 155.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Thomas V. Morris and Christopher Menzel ‘Absolute Creation’ inAmerican Philosophical Quarterly Volume 23, Number 4, October 1986, p. 353–362.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    All parenthetical page references refer to citations from ‘Absolute Creation’.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    See pages 11 and 12 for an account of ontologism.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Compare Alvin Plantinga's definition of divine simplicity: (3) For any properties P and Q in God,God's having P is identical withGod's having Q and each is identical with God. Alvin Plantinga,Does God Have a Nature? (Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 1980), p. 49.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Morris and Menzel argue that even though the existence of God logically entails the existence of the framework, including the divine attributes, and conversely, it is, nonetheless, the case that the latter is causally dependent upon the former. (p. 354–355) However, they do not offer very satisfying accounts of what this causal asymmetrical dependence is. They consider viewing God as a creative mind (p. 355; See above) and offer a thought experiment (p. 359–360) which as they note ‘does not give us a perfect analogy’ (p. 360).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    See Summa Contra Gentiles 1, 21, 5. Compare Plantinga'sDoes God Have a Nature? p. 30Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    See Plantinga,Does God Have a Nature?. p. 46 fl.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    See note 7 Morris and Menzel argue that even though the existence of God logically entails the existence of the framework, including the divine attributes, and conversely, it is, nonetheless, the case that the latter is causally dependent upon the former. (p. 354–355).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Freedom in the relevant sense requires that God's creative activity be consonant with his nature (See the quotations cited above.) However it seems that in this context God could only be free in that sense if there were not a boot-strapping problem; but I have argued above that there is a bootstrapping problemGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    See e.g.De la recherche de la vérité 3, 2, 6.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    See Frederick Copleston,A History of Philosophy Vol. 2:Mediaeval Philosophy Part 1Augustine to Bonaventure (Garden City, New York: Image Books, 1963), p. 75–77.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    St. Paul writes, ‘For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I shall know full just as I have also been fully known.’Corinthians, 13: 12Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Julius R. Weinberg,A Short History of Medieval Philosophy (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1964) p. 41.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer SBM B.V. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Werther
    • 1
  1. 1.MadisonU.S.A.

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