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International Journal of Pancreatology

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 31–38 | Cite as

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDAPanc-28, with features of both acinar and ductal cells

  • Marsha L. Frazier
  • Ester Fernández
  • Rafael de Llorens
  • Nicholas M. Brown
  • Sen Pathak
  • Karen R. Cleary
  • James L. Abbruzzese
  • Karen Berry
  • Matilde Olive
  • Anne Le Maistre
  • Douglas B. Evans
Article

Summary

Conclusion

We established a new human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDAPanc-28. Studies on this new line indicate that it expresses both acinar and ductal gene products suggesting that the patterns of gene expression in the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from which this cell line arose have features similar to those of the protodifferentiated cells hypothesized by Rutter and his colleagues for the developing pancreas (1,2).

Background

The cell line arose from a tumor that, like most pancreatic adenocarcinomas, was ductal on the basis of its histological appearance.

Methods

Once the cell line was established in culture, they were subjected to cytogenetic analysis and tested for their ability to grow in nude mice. RNA from the cells was analyzed by Northern blot analysis and PCR of reverse transcribed cDNA for the expression of both acinar and duct cell gene products. DNA was analyzed for the presence of mutated K-ras at codon 12.

Results

The cell line expressed trypsin and ribonuclease RNA, which are considered to be acinar cell markers, and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which is considered to be a duct-cell markers. The histological appearance of xenografts in nude mice was similar to that of the tumor from which the cell line was established. The chromosome number varied between 46 and 60.

Key Words

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma carbonic anhydrase ribonuclease trypsin tumor cell line 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marsha L. Frazier
    • 1
  • Ester Fernández
    • 5
  • Rafael de Llorens
    • 5
  • Nicholas M. Brown
    • 2
  • Sen Pathak
    • 2
  • Karen R. Cleary
    • 3
  • James L. Abbruzzese
    • 1
  • Karen Berry
    • 2
  • Matilde Olive
    • 1
  • Anne Le Maistre
    • 6
  • Douglas B. Evans
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology and Digestive DiseasesThe University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston
  2. 2.Department of Cell Biology The University of TexasM. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston
  3. 3.Department of Pathology, The University of TexasM. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston
  4. 4.Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of TexasM. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston
  5. 5.Department of Biology, Science FacultyUniversity of GironaSpain
  6. 6.Department of PathologyUniversity of Texas Health Science Center Medical SchoolHouston

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