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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 247–256 | Cite as

An evaluation of atmospheric deposition of trace elements into the great lakes

  • S. Biegalski
  • S. Landsberger
Section 3: Atmospheric Monitoring and Assessment of Trace Elements

Abstract

High-volume air samplers were used to collect aerosol samples on Whatman 41 air filters at the Canadian air sampling stations Burnt Island, Egbert, and Point Petre. Once collected, the samples were analyzed for trace elements by neutron activation analysis. Air concentrations of over 30 trace elements were determined. A special focus was made to utilize Compton suppression gamma-ray spectroscopy and epithermal irradiations to enhance the detection limits of neutron activation analysis. These techniques allowed for the determination of trace elements at very low levels. Results of the study of the tracemetal dry deposition into Lakes Huron and Ontario indicated that the majority of the total deposition resulted from crustal materials. However, dry deposition is also a significant pathway for many toxic anthropogenic trace metals into the Great Lakes.

Index Entries

Aerosols trace elements neutron activation analysis Great Lakes dry deposition 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Biegalski
    • 1
  • S. Landsberger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear EngineeringUniversity of IllinoisUrbana
  2. 2.Nuclear Engineering Teaching LabUniversity of Texas at AustinAustin

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