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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 53, Issue 3, pp 277–283 | Cite as

Rapid fermentation of beer using an immobilized yeast multistage bioreactor

Control of Sulfite Formation
  • Yoshihiro Yamauchi
  • Takanori Okamoto
  • Hiroshi Murayama
  • Akira Nagara
  • Tadashi Kashihara
Original Articles

Abstract

The characteristics of yeast sulfite metabolism in a multistage bioreactor system for beer fermentation were investigated. No sulfite was produced in the continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR). However, large amounts were produced in the packed-bed reactor (PBR). Production of sulfite in the PBR seems to be inevitable when it is operated continuously. In order to control the sulfite level in the young beer, the yeast needs to be reactivated into the growth phase. One possible strategy to achieve this is to aerate and periodically remove yeast clogged in the reactor once every 6–7 months before the sulfite level exceeds a given concentration (e.g., 20 mg/L).

It was confirmed that sulfite production is closely related to the growth condition of the yeast and is therefore important to consider in the control strategy for sulfite when using the immobilized yeast reactor for beer production.

Index Entries

Immobilization bioreactor yeast sulfite, sulfur dioxide beer brewing 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshihiro Yamauchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takanori Okamoto
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Murayama
    • 1
  • Akira Nagara
    • 1
  • Tadashi Kashihara
    • 1
  1. 1.Technology Development Department, Beer DivisionKirin Brewery Co., Ltd.YokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Research Center for Advanced Science and TechnologyUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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