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Forum for Social Economics

, 26:15 | Cite as

Can neoclassical economics become social economics?

  • John E. Elliott
  • Hans E. Jensen
Symposium Can Neoclassical Economics Be Social Economics?
  • 39 Downloads

Abstract

This essay has both a general and a specific purpose. Its general purpose is to pose the question: Can neoclassical economics be social economics? Its answer to this general question is: Yes, but only if it abandons its methodological soul; that is, by abandoning methodological individualism, positivism, and ahistoricism, and expressly and systematically adopting a methodological perspective which is holistic, normative, and historical. Its specific purpose is to identify and examine the major elements in the economics of one leading figure in the historical development of neoclassical economics who self-consciously attempted to combine, to paraphrase Schumpeter, a neoclassical head with a social economics heart: Alfred Marshall.

Keywords

Social Economic Neoclassical Economic Economic Thought Royal Commission Interpersonal Comparison 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Social Economics 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Elliott
    • 1
  • Hans E. Jensen
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Souther CaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.The University of TennesseeKnoxville

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