Advertisement

Gastroenterologia Japonica

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 579–583 | Cite as

Effects of hexamethonium and atropine on the basal levels of immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in dogs

  • Tadashi Misawa
  • Yoshiharu Chijiiwa
  • Hiroshi Ibayashi
Original Article

Summary

The basal levels of immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (IR-VIP) in veins of the gastrointestinal tract and the effect of hexamethonium and atropine on basal levels of IR-VIP were examined in anesthetized dogs. The basal mean plasma IR-VIP levels in the pancreaticoduodenal vein, the mesenteric vein of the jejunum, the mesenteric vein of the ileum and the right colonic vein, but not the left gastroepiploic vein, were significantly higher than those in the femoral vein. These basal levels of IR-VIP were decreased by atropine, but not by hexamethonium. Thus, the main source of basal VIP in the portal vein is probably the duodenum (and pancreas) and the small and large intestine, and the basal levels of VIP are under the control of muscarinic receptors, in canine gastrointestinal tract.

Key Words

Atropine Hexamethonium Radioimmunoassay Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1).
    Said SI, et al: Polypeptide with broad biological activity: Isolation from small intestine. Science 169: 1217, 1970PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2).
    Mutt V, et al: Structure of the porcine vasoactive intestinal octacosapeptide. Eur J Biochem 42: 581, 1974PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3).
    Said SI, et al: Isolation from porcine intestinal wall of a vasoactive octacosapeptide related to secretin and to glucagon. Eur J Biochem 28: 199, 1972PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4).
    Tatemoto K, et al: Isolation and primary structure of human PHI (peptide HI). FEBS Lett 174: 258, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5).
    Yanaihara N, et al: Immunological aspects of secretin, substance P and VIP. Gastroenterology 72: 803, 1977PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6).
    Fahrenkrug J: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide: measurement, distribution and putative neurotransmitter function. Digestion 19: 149, 1979PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7).
    Said SI, et al: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide: abundant immunoreactivity in neural cell lines and normal nervous tissues. Science 192: 907, 1976PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8).
    Said SI: VIP overview, in “Gut Hormones” 2nd Ed, by Bloom SR and Polak JM. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, London, Melbourne and New York, 1981, p 379Google Scholar
  9. 9).
    Bloom SR, et al: Vasoactive intestinal peptide and watery-diarrhea syndrome. Lancet 2: 14, 1973PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10).
    Fahrenkrug J, et al: Radioimmunoassay of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma. J Lab Clin Med 89: 1379, 1977PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11).
    Burhol PG, et al: Radioimmunoassay of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma. Scand J Gastroenterol 13: 807, 1978PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12).
    Mitchell SJ, et al: Measurement of fasting and postprandial plasma VIP in man. Gut 19: 1043, 1978PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13).
    Schaffalitzky de Muckadell OB, et al: Release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) by electric stimulation of the vagal nerves. Gastroenterology 72: 373, 1977PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14).
    Chayvialle JA, et al: Release of vasoactive intestinal peptide by distention of the proximal stomach in dogs. Gut 21: 745, 1980PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15).
    Chayvialle JA, et al: Effects of test meal, intragastric nutrients, and intraduodenal bile on plasma concentrations of immunoreactive somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide in dogs. Gastroenterology 79: 844, 1980PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16).
    Schaffalitzky de Muckadell OB, et al: Release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) by intraduodenal stimuli. Scand J Gastroenterol 12: 793, 1977PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17).
    Bloom SR, et al: Release of VIP, secretin and motilin after duodenal acidification in man. Acta HepatoGastroenterol 25: 365, 1978Google Scholar
  18. 18).
    Bitar KN, et al: Neural release of vasoactive intestinal peptide from the gut. Gastroenterology 79: 1288, 1980PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19).
    Fahrenkrug J, et al: Nervous release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the gastrointestinal tract of cats: possible physiological implications. J Physiol 284: 291, 1978PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20).
    Fahrenkrug J, et al: Influence of the autonomic nervous system on the release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide from the porcine gastrointestinal tract. J Physiol 280: 405, 1978PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21).
    Mitchell SJ, et al: Massive release of vasoactive intestinal peptide after intestinal ischaemia. J Endocrinol 73: 14, 1977Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadashi Misawa
    • 1
  • Yoshiharu Chijiiwa
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Ibayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Third Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of MedicineKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan

Personalised recommendations