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ECTJ

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 16–25 | Cite as

Faculty perceptions of instructional development and the success/failure of an instructional development program: A naturalistic study

  • Sharon A. Shrock
Articles
  • 32 Downloads

Keywords

Faculty Member Instructional Technology Instructional Development Naturalistic Study Faculty Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon A. Shrock
    • 1
  1. 1.Curriculum, Instruction, and MediaSouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondale

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